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Education and the Racial Divide

When it came to education in North Carolina, spending for white and black students was far from equal. Starting in 1915, a collaborative effort of wealthy citizens, foundations and grassroots leaders helped to enrich the education of African American students in a variety of ways including building new, modern facilities and developing programs for teachers to learn new techniques. These regional models helped close the gap between whites and African Americans.

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Credits

  • Professor Jacobs School early 1900s. Courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Charlotte Hawkins Brown. Courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Palmer Memorial Industrial Institute. Memorial Hall. 1921. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
  • Charlotte Hawkins Brown (center) and the faculty of Palmer Memorial Institute, ca. 1907. Courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Palmer Memorial Institute, 1948 Seniors. Courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • West End School. First Grade Class Photo. 1906. Eleta Atwater, daughter of Mamie Harper and J. Atwater, is 2nd from right, front row. North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
  • Franklin (Chicago) summer open air school, 1917, manual training class / Burke & Atwell, Chgo.1917. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ppmsca-11778
  • The pupils in the Cherryville N.C. Graded School. 200 attend, including the High School. Cherryville, North Carolina. November 1908. Lewis Wickes Hine, photographer. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, National Child Labor Committee Collection, LC-DIG-nclc-01365
  • Unidentified group of girls sewing. 1915-1947. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
  • Julius Rosenwald of Sears-Roebuck Co. 1917. Harris & Ewing, photographer. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, photograph by Harris & Ewing, LC-DIG-hec-08365
  • Rosenwald School. 1924. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
  • Girls Jumping Rope at recess. 1916. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
  • “Brevard Colored School #2”, later “Rosenwald School”. Courtesy of the Rowell Bosse North Carolina Room, Transylvania County Library.
  • Photograph of Anna T. Jeanes, undated. Southern Education Foundation Records, Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library
  • Johnston County Training School. 1916. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
  • Anie Wealthy Holland. Five North Carolina Negro educators,Publisher: Chapel Hill, Newbold, N. C., University of North Carolina Press, 1939.
  • Primary Class, Wake County Training School. 1917. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
  • Graduating Class Elizabeth City State Normal School. Session 1920-21. Papers of Jackson Davis, MSS 3072, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.

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These efforts to improve black schooling were important to improving the state's well-being.

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