Voices / Protecting Our Coast

Issue Area

Environments
Bookmark Feedback

Protecting Our Coast

By the early 1970s, overdevelopment had swept through much of the eastern coast of the United States. In an effort to better protect its coastal environment and ensure careful development, North Carolina passed the Coastal Area Management Act or CAMA. The act would lead the way for North Carolina’s coastal counties to adopt comprehensive land use plans that promote economic progress while still preserving the state’s beautiful beaches.

View Credits & Resources

Credits

  • Million Dollar Pier, Atlantic City 1974. Photograph by David C. Cook, courtesy of Robert Ketcherside.
  • Atlantic City Boardwalk from Balcony, 1968. Photograph by David C. Cook, courtesy of Robert Ketcherside.
  • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, early 1980s. Photograph by Hugh Morton, North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina Library at Chapel Hill
  • James Holshouser. Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Inauguration of N.C. Governor James Holshouser, January 5, 1973. North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library
  • Outer Banks of North Carolina. Pattern of development at Nags Head, 1979. Courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey
  • Dolos, Cape Town, 26 July 2006. Adam Brink
  • Footage from Jockey’s Ridge for All the People. Courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Atlantic Beach, Fort Macon, NC. Courtesy of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University.
  • Kitty Hawk, NC, September 23, 2003 — A house right on the coast of the Outer Banks of North Carolina collasped when it was undercut by the storm surge from Hurricane Isabel. Courtesy of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Photographer: Mark Wolfe.
  • West End of Shackleford Banks - Kill Devil Hills, 2008. Courtesy of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University.
  • Tubbs Inlet - Fort Macon, 2008. Courtesy of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University.
  • Life Guard Station at Wrightsvile Beach, North Carolina. (c) 2010, Jon Curnow

Add Your Voice

Creating the Coastal Management Act was important to protecting the state's beaches and coastal environment.

374

Total Votes

60%

Strongly Agree

24%

Agree

3%

Disagree

4%

Strongly Disagree

9%

Don't Know